Code of Conduct

We are dedicated to providing a harassment-free and inclusive event experience for everyone. This code of conduct represents a document of how we expect our members, officers, Board of Directors, ambassadors, delegate ambassadors and all participants in our community to act towards one another

Women in Voice is building community for women in this new technology space. We use the words “woman/women” to refer to anyone who identifies as a female, non-binary, genderqueer, genderfluid, agender, and all minority genders. This absolutely includes trans women. If you feel like you might belong in our community, we bet you do. 

At Women in Voice, we endeavor to treat all humans with inherent dignity. This is regardless of gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, disabilities, neurodiversity, mental health, physical appearance, body size, ethnicity, nationality, race, age, religion, or other protected category. This list is not intended to be exhaustive, but serves as a basis of categories to consider.

We do not tolerate harassment in any form. We take violations of our policy seriously and will respond appropriately.

Specifically for the Women in Voice global community, we endeavor to be respectful to differences of culture, time zone, and norms of speaking on video, etc. We respect people’s desire to speak up, be passive, and use video or not at events. We respect the right to privacy and consent of data and photos. 

Our community comes from many different backgrounds and from many different career paths and we must be mindful that some are more business-oriented, more or less technical, more or less academic, more or less of a certain background. 

Gender and Intersectionality

We use the words “woman/women” to refer to anyone who identifies as a female, non-binary, genderqueer, genderfluid, gender non conforming agender, and all minority genders. Women and people who identify with minority genders come in all kinds of colors, shapes, and sizes and we support all of them.

As an organization, we consider ourselves intersectional feminists, though we do not expect each person involved in the organization to identify in this way. Feminism considers women, people who identify with a minority gender, and men to be equal people while also recognizing the oppression of the past and present towards non-male people.

Intersectional feminism is a specific type of feminism that not only considers gender, but also myriad aspects of identities—race, gender, sexual orientation, physical ability, cognitive ability. Women of color experience similar issues to women with chronic illnesses, but there are also parts of their experiences that are different. The way our identities intersect are aspects to consider and be aware of to support each other.

Additionally, all people can be allies to each other. An ally is someone who supports 

Be excellent to each other.

We want the event to be an excellent experience for everyone regardless of gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, disabilities, neurodiversity, physical appearance, body size, ethnicity, nationality, race, age, religion, or other protected category. Treat everyone with respect. Participate while acknowledging that everyone deserves to be here — and each of us has the right to enjoy our experience without fear of harassment, discrimination, or condescension, whether blatant or via micro-aggressions. Jokes shouldn’t demean others. Consider what you are saying and how it would feel if it were said to or about you.

Practice saying “Yes and” to each other.

It’s a theatre improvisation technique to build on each other’s ideas. We believe that building the future together begins with inclusive “yes and” type of language usage. We all benefit when we create together. This policy extends to all in-person and online events, talks, forums, workshops, codelabs, social media, parties, hallway conversations, all attendees, partners, sponsors, volunteers, event staff, etc. 

Constructive Criticism

Saying no is an important skill in addition to yes. While we love alignment and agreement, constructive criticism and disagreement is healthy and important. Constructive criticism is the type of feedback that brings up both positive and negative aspects of something in a constructive and respectful way. Fostering an environment of feedback, discussion, and collaboration are crucial to well-functioning organizations. Listening, learning, and iterating are all part of this constructive process. 

Speak up if you see or hear something.

Harassment is not tolerated, and you are empowered to politely engage when you or others are disrespected. The person making you feel uncomfortable may not be aware of what they are doing, and politely bringing their behavior to their attention is encouraged. If a participant engages in harassing or uncomfortable behavior, the event organizers may take any action they deem appropriate, including warning or expelling the offender from the event. If you are being harassed or feel uncomfortable, notice that someone else is being harassed, or have any other concerns, contact a member of the event staff immediately.

Harassment is not tolerated.

Harassment includes, but is not limited to: verbal language that reinforces social structures of domination related to gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, disabilities, neurodiversity, physical appearance, body size, ethnicity, nationality, race, age, religion, or other protected category; sexual imagery in public spaces; deliberate intimidation; stalking; following; harassing photography or recording; sustained disruption of talks or other events; offensive verbal language; inappropriate physical contact; and unwelcome sexual attention. Participants asked to stop any harassing behavior are expected to comply immediately.

 

If a participant engages in harassing or uncomfortable behavior, the event organizers may take any action they deem appropriate, including warning or expelling the offender from the event. Our event staff can usually be identified by special badges/attire.  In case of an online event those in charge will introduce themselves upfront. Please note, while we take all concerns raised seriously, we will use our discretion to determine when and how to follow up on reported incidents, and may decline to take any further action and/or may direct the participant to other resources for resolution.

Bots and Artificial Intelligence (AI) Usage

Bots and/or AI are not permitted to attend free or ticked events without prior written consent, i.e. having a bot call into a Zoom call without prior authorization. This also applies to closed meetings between people within our organisation, such as calls between ambassadors or board members. If we use AI with our organisation for any decision making process it’s usage will be fully disclosed. 

Privacy and Personal data

WiV respects privacy and treats personal data with reverence and attention to ensure the safety and security of our community/members and officers. 

Why this policy is important.

Harassment at events and in online communities is unfortunately common. Creating an official policy aims to improve this by making it clear that harassment of anyone for any reason is not acceptable within our events and communities. This policy may prevent harassment by clearly defining expectations for behavior, aims to provide reassurance, and encourages people who have had bad experiences at other events to participate in this one.

 

This document is based on and influenced by several other community policies including: University of Arizona Women’s Hackathon, Google Community Events Guidelines, Ohio LinuxFest Anti-Harassment policy, Con Anti Harassment Project, Geek Feminism Wiki (created by the Ada Initiative), ConfCodeofConduct.com, JSconf, Rust, Diversity in Python, and Write/Speak/Code.

 

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